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April 22, 2014 – Father John Acrea

Is Jesus the ultimate example of masculinity–a leader, father, warrior, lover, and miracle worker? Fr John will make that case for us on “The Quest for a Culture of Life in America”, Tuesday at NOON, ET. We need masculine men to establish a Cuture of Life in the home, parish community and country. Are you man enough to make difference?

Father John Acrea is a retired priest of the Diocese of Des Moines Iowa. During his “active duty” he was the Vocations Director for the Des Moines Diocese and a Spiritual Director for seminarians at St John Vianney College Seminary at the University of St Thomas in St Paul Minnesota.

He is in demand as a speaker at men’s conferences–like the recent “Man-UP” event in Des Moines.

The typical male probably does not think of Jesus as his image of manliness, or masculinity. Men are more likely to think of a great athlete, a combat veteran, a hero or someone who has overcome great diversity and challenges to be a success in business. And it is true that these men are exhibiting some of the characteristics of masculinity, but Fr John would say that each and every one of us can be (and many already are) men of exceptional masculinity.

Are priests and bishops and popes “masculine”? Is going to the seminary similar to joining the Marines?

Ladies, don’t go away. Fr John says women have these same characteristics, but manifest them in different ways.

April 1, 2014 – Katherine Ginkel

Katherine Ginkel has a unique job as educator of St Jude Hospice staff personnel on the Ethical and Religious Directives (ERDs) for Catholic Health Care Workers. These Directives were developed by the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to set a standard of care that is to be expected by all Catholic health care institutions and their employees and associates. These ERDs are periodically updated to reflect the ever changing threats to the dignified treatment and care of those who are in need of care in clinics, hospitals and in all critical and end-of-life care situations. For example, the ERDs absolutely forbid abortion and euthanasia.

The hospice industry is not always respectful of the dignity of human persons and their right to a natural death. Hospice care can be on opportunity for euthanasia as we reported in one of last year’s “The Quest for a Culture of Life in America” programs. The vocabulary now includes the phrase “stealth euthanasia” to describe the over dosing of pain medications to cause death.

St Jude Hospice was started by Tom Moreland as an authentically Catholic (loyal to Church teaching as reflected in the ERDs) alternative to secular hospice. In 2008, Tom started Saint Jude Healthcare, which eventually became the parent to Saint Jude Hospice and Spirit Homecare. Tom managed or owned hospices from Ohio to Mississippi, and Minnesota to California. There are now 13 St Jude Hospice locations in Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas. Tom has requests from several bishops to open new locations in their dioceses.

Yolanda Bello – November 2, 2011

FRANCESCA FRANCHINA, MS Ed. talks with artist/ sculptress Yolanda Bello  of Council Bluffs, Iowa and Mary Popp of Dayton, Ohio, founder of Sporch,  focusing on the world of art and artists; liturgical and church art; the climate that sets the tone for appreciating inspired Catholic art propelling artists into the realm of evangelization and discipleship. How  can parents, grandparents, teachers  and artists  make a difference in the lives of their young and their own lives,  through the liturgical feasts and seasons of the Church and the art that accompanies them or should accompany them? What Christian art can do in their homes, schools, offices and the marketplace. Tune in; find out and share your  art experiences, stories and tried and true ideas about art and sacramentals.